Photos of the 150th Anniversary of Disestablishment in Cork, Cloyne and Ross

The 150th anniversary of the reading for the first time in February 1870 of the Preamble and Declaration to the Constitution of the Church of Ireladn was re-enacted in Cork on Monday, 24th February by students from Ashton School, Bandon Grammar School, and Midleton College.  The full report is HERE

Here is the gallery of photos of the occasion:

Posted in Anglicanism, Anniversaries, Ashton School, Bandon Grammar School, Bishop, Bishops of Cork, Cathedral, Church History, Church of Ireland, Commemoration, Diocese, Disestablishment, Drama, Midleton College, People from Cork, People from the Diocese, Preamble and Declaration

Defining Church of Ireland Moment in 1870 re-enacted in Cork, Cloyne and Ross

Today, in St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork, young people from Ashton School, Bandon Grammar School and Midleton College, accepted the invitation of the Bishop of Cork, Dr Paul Colton, to join him, some of the clergy of the Diocese, Dr Richard Clarke (recently retired Archbishop of Armagh) and Bishop Michael Mayes, in re-enacting a seminal moment in the history of the Church of Ireland: the reading of the Church’s Preamble and Declaration for the first time by Bishop John Gregg of Cork on 19th February 1870 at the General Convention of the Church of Ireland.

Saturday, 19th February 1870
Picture: Jim Coughlan

Amidst the fallout of the passing of the Irish Church Act in 1869,  the Church of Ireland had just over a year to organise itself on a new footing before it would be disestablished on 1st January 1871.  A new Constitution was required, and a body to be legal trustee of the Church’s property (the Representative. Church Body) was to be set up by Royal Charter.

Pictured are, Ashton School students, Kyle, Luke and Daniel, at the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

Pictured are, in costume Ashton School students, Sadhbh, Emily, Lucy and Claire, at the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

In 1870, therefore, a lot of homework having been done by an Organization Committee, the Archbishop and Bishops, together with clergy and lay people elected from every Diocese, met for two extended sessions as a General Convention in Dublin: a Spring session of 41 days and an Autumn session of 16 days.

Pictured are Bishop Michael Mayes and Bishop Richard Clarke at the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

At the outset it was essential to set down first principles; a new Church was not being founded, rather it was a continuation of the ancient Church, catholic and apostolic, which had espoused also the principles of the Reformation.

The Dean of Ross and the Bishop of Cork discuss the draft text of the Preamble and Declaration at the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

On Saturday 19th February 1870, the fifth day of the General Convention, having first put in place the rules to order the way it would work, the meeting turned, as of first importance, to first principles: the continuity, tradition and key beliefs of the Church of Ireland.  These were set out in a Preamble and Declaration which was proposed for adoption by the Bishop of Cork, John Gregg, and seconded by the Archbishop of Dublin, Richard Chevenix Trench.  So solemn was the moment that the Journal of the General Convention records that those present were’ standing their heads uncovered’; they removed their hats.

The solemn reading of the Preamble and Declaration for the first time in 1870. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

The solemn reading of the Preamble and Declaration for the first time in 1870. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

This short but powerful and symbolic moment in the history of the Church of Ireland was re-enacted in part of St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork which was transformed to emulate the Antient Concert Rooms on Great Brunswick Street (now Pearse Street) Dublin where the General Convention convened.

At the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

The Chaplains of the three schools – Drew Ruttle, the Reverend Anne Skuse, and Canon Andrew Orr – recruited the cast who were decked in period costume sourced by Drew Ruttle who also oversees the drama department at Ashton School.   Dr Richard Clarke fulfilled the role of his predecessor Archbishop in Armagh, Marcus Gervais Beresford.  Bishop Mayes took the part of the Archbishop of Dublin, Richard Chevenix Trench.

Pictured is Bishop Richard Clarke at the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

The re-enactment was filmed for posterity, with a number of rehearsals and ‘takes’ during the morning.  In a rest between filming, Bishop Colton introduced the students to one of the Trustees of the Diocese, Mr David Bird, whose great-grandfather, D.R.P. Sarsfield, J.P. of Doughcloyne in Cork was one of the laymen representing the Diocese.  Sarsfield Road and the Sarsfield Roundabout on Cork’s South Ring Road are named after him.

Mr David Bird, Diocesan Trustee (back row, second from left) with the cast at the re-enactment
Picture: Jim Coughlan

It is a fact that women were not members of the General Convention in 1870.  Indeed, they were not part of the decision-making synods of the Church until the 1950s.  It is not known whether or not they attended as guests, but in this re-enactment they did, emphasising the historical fact of their non-participation.

Pictured are (back row) Elena, Midleton College, Lillie, Clodagh and Emily, all Bandon Grammar School, (front row) Chloe, Kerrie, Louise and Ava, all from Midleton College, at the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

Having rehearsed and filmed, before packing up, the entire moment was solemnly re-enacted in commemoration of that historic moment on 19th February 1870 when Bishop John Gregg read aloud the Preamble and Declaration for the first time.

Bishop Paul Colton reads the Preamble and Declaration following in the steps of his predecessor, Bishop John Gregg of Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

After the re-enactment, the entire cast, accepted the Bishop’s invitation to lunch at the Bishop’s Palace across the road where everyone relaxed under the watchful eye of the portrait of Bishop John Gregg, and, indeed, the portraits of bishops as far back as 1582.

A happy group before lunch after the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

A full gallery of photos is HERE

A short video will also appear here in due course.

The re-enactment at the 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, at Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.
Picture: Jim Coughlan

Posted in Ashton School, Bandon Grammar School, Bishops of Cork, Cathedral, Church History, Church of Ireland, Commemoration, Diocese, Disestablishment, Drama, Midleton College, People from Cork, People from the Diocese, Preamble and Declaration, Schools in the Diocese, Sesquicentenary

Reflection and Renewal for Local Lay Ministers in Cork, Cloyne and Ross

The  Local Lay Ministers (Pastoral) (previously known as lay pastoral assistants) of the Diocese Cork, Cloyne, & Ross met on the 30th January in Northridge House for an evening of reflection and renewal.

The Local Lay Ministers (Pastoral) have a unique role in the diocese, being called to bring Christ’s presence to all, through their care for others. They are lay volunteers who are  part of the local parish ministry team, and each  is in a mentoring relationship with the rector or priest-in-charge. They completed a two year course in pastoral studies laid down by the Bishop of Cork, and delivered under the supervision of the Rev’d Bruce Pierce, Director of Education at Northridge House Education and Research Centre at St Luke’s Charity Cork

The evening was facilitated by the Rev’d Bruce Pierce who encouraged, and affirmed their ministry and offered his guidance to them.

The Revd Paul Arbuthnot, Chaplain to the Guild of Lay Ministry commented:

The Local Lay Ministers (Pastoral) greatly enrich the life of this diocese, and we give thanks for their calling. The Guild are very grateful to the Rev’d Bruce Pierce for his time, wisdom, and skill in facilitating this evening.

If there are lay people in the United Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross who are interested in training to serve voluntarily in this local ministry they should speak with their rector or priest-in-charge.

Some of the trained Local Lay Ministers (Pastoral) from Cork, Cloyne and Ross who attended the evening of reflection and renewal.

Posted in Adult Education, Continuing Ministerial Education, Lay Ministry, Local Lay Ministers (Pastoral)

Former Irish Hockey Star John Jermyn Appointed to Voluntary Legal Post in Cork, Cloyne and Ross

Former Irish international hockey player and Olympian, John C. Jermyn, has been appointed by the Bishop of Cork, Dr Paul Colton, to be the new Diocesan Registrar of the United Dioceses of Cork, Cloyne and Ross.  John is a parishioner of the parish of Douglas Union, with Frankfield ion the southern suburbs of Cork City.

John C. Jermyn in his final appearance for Ireland in June 2018

John’s appointment is historic and significant in that it comes at the start of a new century of voluntary service in that particular role to the United Dioceses by the Jermyn family.  John C Jermyn succeeds his father John L. Jermyn who was appointed Diocesan Registrar in 1980.  The new Registrar’s grandfather – John Bennett Jermyn – served in the same post from 1947 to 1980, and his great-grandfather  – also John Jermyn – was appointed Diocesan Registrar in 1920 by the then Bishop: Dr Charles Dowse.

John was educated at St Luke’s National School, Douglas, Cork, Ashton School, Cork and at University College Cork. He qualified as a solicitor in 2011 and, having worked with the firm of RDJ, Ronan, Daly, Jermyn Solicitors for seven years, he took up the role of in-house legal counsel  with Global Shares in August 2018.

Responding to his appointment John said:

I am very honoured to accept the position of Diocesan Registrar. This year marks the 100th year that a member of my family has held the role and I am proud to follow in their footsteps. I look forward to working with Bishop Paul and his team for many years to come.

John’s career as a sportsman and international hockey player is well known. Having represented Ireland at under-16, u-18 and u-21 levels, between 2002 and 2018 he then made 179 appearances and scored 93 goals for Ireland. He represented Ireland at the Olympics in 2016, and from 2012 to 2018 held the record as Ireland’s top goal scorer. His home hockey club is Cork Church of Ireland based at Garryduff Sports Centre (ICICYMA – the Incorporated Church of Ireland Cork Young Men’s Association).

A date will be set in due course when the Diocese will mark both the retirement of his father John L. Jermyn, and when John C Jermyn will be installed.

Each Church of Ireland Diocese has a Diocesan Registry in a place named by the bishop, and the Diocesan Council is required to make arrangements for the safe custody of the registry and its contents.  The contents may include: judgments or orders of the Diocesan Court or the Court of the General Synod;  records of appointments of clergy, appointments of clergy by licence, retirements and resignations; the appointment of deputy chancellors and deputy registrars of the Diocese.

The Diocesan Registrar has responsibility for these matters, and also the keeping of a verified roll of the clergy of the Diocese which is to be tabled at meetings of diocesan Boards of Patronage (which nominates clergy to the bishop for appointment to parishes).  More generally, Diocesan Registrars are frequently turned to by bishops for advice in legal matters.

John C. Jermyn, Diocesan Registrar of the United Dioceses of Cork, Cloyne and Ross.
Picture: Jim Coughlan.

Posted in Announcements, Appointments, Bishop, Church Law, Diocesan Registrar, Diocese, Lay Ministry, Voluntary Work

St Valentine’s Day Love for Cork Charity from Children of St Mary’s National School, Carrigaline, County Cork

The children in St Mary’s School, Carrigaline, Co Cork again demonstrated their love for their Neighbours on St Valentine’s Day with their wonderful collection of items for Cork Penny Dinners.

A big collection of gifts for Cork Penny Dinners.

It was much appreciated by Catriona Twomey and her hard working team in Cork City who serve up to 2000 freshly made meals per week at their premises. This compares to approx. 150 or less per week prior to the recession.

Gifts with a message to everyone at Cork Penny Dinners from the children of St Mary’s National School, Carrigaline, County Cork on St Valentine’s Day.

Posted in Charity Work, Children's Ministry, Church in Society, Education, Five Marks of Mission, Schools in the Diocese

‘Big Sing’ at St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork

On Saturday 8th February 2020 Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedra, Cork hosted a ‘Big Sing’ organised by Cork International Choral Festival. Over forty singers tackled the ever popular ‘Gloria’ by Vivaldi accompanied by Robbie Carroll on the Cathedral organ and conducted by Peter Stobart who is both the Cathedral’s Director of Music and Artistic Director of the Choral Festival.

The solos were sung by Saoirse Daly (soprano) and Denise Brueckl (alto) who are both Lay Vicars in the Cathedral Choir, and the famous duet ‘Laudamus te’ was sung by two younger choristers Killian and Rory Nuzum.

The Cathedral will be holding another Come and Sing event on Saturday 28th March from 2pm when the work will be Stainer’s Crucifixion. Please email Peter Stobart to register your interest:  click here

The ‘Big Sing’ at St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork

Posted in Cathedral, Church in Society, Church Music, Cork International Choral Festival

Cork Re-enactment of an Historic Day in the Life of the Church of Ireland: 19th February 1870

In the coming days, an historic and defining moment in the history of the Church of Ireland will be re-enacted in Cork, as a contribution by the United Dioceses of Cork, Cloyne and Ross Diocesan to the current 150th anniversary commemorations of the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland.

Bishop Paul Colton, with the support of chaplains at the three diocesan second level schools (Ashton School, Bandon Grammar School and Midleton College), has invited drama students to join him and some of the clergy of the Diocese in period costume to re-enact that moment on 19th February 1870 when his predecessor, Bishop John Gregg, read aloud the first draft of the Preamble and Declaration – a statement of fundamental characteristics in the belief and governance of the Church of Ireland, affirming its continuity with both the ‘Ancient Catholic and Apostolic Church of Ireland’ and also its character as ‘a reformed and Protestant church.’

 

The 19th February 1870 was a significant day in the history of the Church of Ireland.  It was the fifth day of the General Convention of the Church of Ireland  which had been meeting at the Antient Concert Rooms at 52 Great Brunswick Street (Pearse Street today).  The Archbishop of Armagh, Marcus Gervais Beresford, was in the chair and the proceedings were opened with a bible reading and prayer conducted by the Archbishop of Dublin, Richard Chevenix Trench.

The Antient Concert Rooms today from Archiseek

During that morning session, the Preamble and Declaration to the draft Constitution of the Church of Ireland was proposed by the Bishop of Cork and seconded by the Archbishop of Dublin.

It was read aloud by the Bishop of Cork, Dr John Gregg.  Clearly everyone present recognised that this was a solemn moment.  They stood up and removed their hats while the Bishop read out the document which, following discussion and amendment, was adopted on 22nd February 1870.  It has a special character within the polity of the Church of Ireland;  it has never been amended since and is often referred to as ‘one of the title deeds of the Church of Ireland.’

Bishop Colton will be joined by two retired bishops at the re-enactment.  Bishop Richard Clarke, recently retired as Archbishop of Armagh, will fulfil the role of his predecessor Archbishop in Armagh, Marcus Gervais Beresford, and the former Bishop of Limerick will play the part of Archbishop Richard Chevenix Trench.  Barrister Tim Bracken will be present as the assessor.  Drew Ruttle, chaplain at Ashton School, has sourced the costumes for the occasion.

‘One thing we haven’t been able to ascertain’ says Bishop Colton ‘is whether or not in those Antient Concert Rooms, women attended as spectators or not . We know from the lists that no women were members and it would be many decades more (the early 1950s) before women took their place as members of the General Synod, so we have taken a liberty of assuming that women may have been in attendance to view proceedings, although not as members of the Convention itself.  There is a certain irony that in later years the same Antient Concert Rooms would be used as the offices of the first suffragette society in Ireland:  the Irish Women’s Franchise League.’

As a workshop style event, it isn’t open to the public, but the end-result, the re-enactment,  will be videoed and photographed for posterity and publication.

The General Convention met for two extended sessions in 1870; the First Session was 41 days between 15th February 1870 to 2nd April 1870, and the Second Session for 16 days sat between 18th October and 4th November the same year.  Its task was to prepare the Church of Ireland for its disestablishment (when it would cease to be the State church) on 1st January 1871, following the enactment of the Irish Church Act 1869.

Bishop Paul Colton said:

Most of the events to mark the 150th anniversary years of the disestablishment of. the Church of Ireland are, understandably, Dublin-linked and based.  Although this moment of reading the Preamble and Declaration on 19th February 1870 also happened in Dublin, at the Antient Concert Rooms on what was then Great Brunswick Street in my own grandmother’s home parish, we have latched onto the Cork connection through my predecessor Bishop John Gregg to create the opportunity for a local commemoration.

While it should be fun, there is also a serious side.  It holds before us all the fundamental principles of belief and governance as set out in that document.

From our 21st Century perspective it also highlights the fact that  it was only men, and men of a particular socio-economic grouping at that, who participated in that General Convention.

Following the re-enactment Bishop Colton will be hosting the cast of about 50 people to lunch at the Bishop’s Palace where they can see, at first hand, the portraits of Bishop John Gregg, and his son Bishop Robert Gregg who succeeded his father as Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross.

Later this year Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral Cork will begin a year of celebrations to mark the 150th anniversary of the consecration of the Cathedral, another historic moment overseen by Bishop John Gregg.

Portrait of Bishop John Gregg in Bishop’s House in Cork.

Posted in Bishop, Bishops of Cork, Cathedral, Church History, Church of Ireland, Commemoration, Disestablishment, Drama, Heritage, History, Schools in the Diocese, Sesquicentenary, Youth Work