Cork Clergyman joins Cycle in aid of Saint Luke’s Charity and Home

The Reverend Paul Robinson, Chaplain to Saint Luke’s Home, Cork (and priest-in-charge at Saint Anne’s Church, Shandon in Cork) joined a small group of co-workers from St Luke’s Home, including CEO Tony O’Brien, Fiona Dwyer, Eileen Ferguson and Paul Morrissey to cycle 85 km two weekends ago.  They had originally planned to do the ‘Tour de Beara’ an 85km cycle ride around the Beara Peninsula, taking in the Caha Pass and the Healy Pass; all in aid of Saint Luke’s Home, a charity caring for older people and people living with dementia in Cork since 1872.

The intrepid group of cyclists (l-r) Eileen Ferguson, Fiona Dwyer, Paul Morrissey, the Reverend Paul Robinson and Tony O’Brien.

Unfortunately, the ‘Tour de Beara’ was cancelled due to the Coronavirus Pandemic.  But that didn’t let the group off the hook of cycling 85km.  Instead of Beara for the fundraiser, the group did the Dungarvan/Waterford Greenway on Saturday 12th September.

The Greenway is fantastic for cycling (as well as walking or running) with lots of beautiful scenery to enjoy along the way.  The weather was ‘grand’ as they cycled out to Waterford, but the wind was against everyone as the group cycled back to Dungarvan, but nevertheless everyone had a great cycle.

On the Greenway

Paul said:

Some of us had been in training for it, some of us hadn’t!!!  Thanks to my colleagues and some extra friends and family who cycled with us and who kept us going with plenty of chats and laughs along the way.

The Reverend Paul Robinson gets his bike ready outside the rectory.

It was a fundraiser/sponsored cycle ride at a time when all the usual essential fundraising activities for the charity have been hit. If you would like to sponsor the group then you still can at https://give.everydayhero.com/ie/tour-de-beara-2020

The Reverend Paul Robinson on the greenway cycle in aid of Saint Luke’ Charity and Home, Cork.

Posted in Care of the Older Person, Chaplaincies, Charities in the Diocese, Charity Work, Church in Society, Clergy, Community Involvement, Contemporary Issues, Corona Virus, COVID-19, Dementia Care, Diocese, Five Marks of Mission, Fund-Raising

Drive-in Harvest Service in County Cork Church of Ireland Parish

On Sunday 20th September, Moviddy Union of Parishes in the Diocese of Cork held a united ‘Drive-in’ Harvest in Peter Hynes’ field opposite St Mark’s Church, Kilbonane in the village of Aherla, County Cork.

Drive-in Harvest in Moviddy Union of Parishes, County Cork

The weather was perfect and there was a great turnout.  The guest preacher was the Reverend Martin O’Kelly, rector of Kingscourt Union, Cavan. The priest-in-charge of Moviddy Union is the Reverend David Bowles, who is also Assistant Church of Ireland Chaplain at Cork University Hospital.

The Rev. Martin O’Kelly (left) and the Reverend David Bowles

Music was provided by Colin Nicholls on keyboard and his grandchildren, Alison on the flute and Shane on the guitar.

The musical Nicholls family with the Reverend David Bowles

Many parishioners worked hard to make the morning a success.

Music at the drive-in harvest

There was a collection of non-perishable goods in aid of St Vincent de Paul and Ann O’Flynn was present to accept them and say a few words of thanks.

Drive-in Harvest in Moviddy Union of Parishes, County Cork

Posted in Church Music, Church of Ireland, Churches in Cork, Community Involvement, Corona Virus, COVID-19, Diocese, Five Marks of Mission, Fresh Expressions, Harvest Thanksgiving, Parish News

On Sunday 20th September, Moviddy Union of Parishes in the Diocese of Cork held a united ‘Drive-in’ Harvest in Peter Hynes’ field opposite St Mark’s Church, Kilbonane in the village of Aherla, County Cork.

Drive-in Harvest in Moviddy Union of Parishes, County Cork

The weather was perfect and there was a great turnout.  The guest preacher was the Reverend Martin O’Kelly, rector of Kingscourt Union, Cavan. The priest-in-charge of Moviddy Union is the Reverend David Bowles, who is also Assistant Church of Ireland Chaplain at Cork University Hospital.

The Rev. Martin O’Kelly (left) and the Reverend David Bowles

Music was provided by Colin Nicholls on keyboard and his grandchildren, Alison on the flute and Shane on the guitar.

The musical Nicholls family with the Reverend David Bowles

Many parishioners worked hard to make the morning a success.

Music at the drive-in harvest

There was a collection of non-perishable goods in aid of St Vincent de Paul and Ann O’Flynn was present to accept them and say a few words of thanks.

Drive-in Harvest in Moviddy Union of Parishes, County Cork

Posted in Church Music, Churches in Cork, Community Involvement, Corona Virus, COVID-19, Diocese, Fresh Expressions, Harvest Thanksgiving

Appointment to Mallow Union of Parishes, United Dioceses of Cork, Cloyne and Ross

Archdeacon Adrian Wilkinson, Commissary to the Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, the Right Reverend Dr Paul Colton, is delighted to announce the appointment of the Venerable Meurig Williams, who currently is serving as Archdeacon of France and Monaco, Commissary and Chaplain to the Bishop in Europe, to be the new Incumbent of Mallow Union of  Parishes.

Archdeacon Meurig Williams

Meurig Williams was born in Bangor, North Wales, where his father was a Baptist minister and grew up in a Welsh-speaking home. After studying modern languages at the University of Aberystwyth, including a year in Bordeaux, he was a teacher in a secondary school near Cardiff for four years.

He returned to the University of Wales to study theology and trained for ordination at Westcott House, Cambridge. He was ordained in Bangor Cathedral in 1992 and served a curacy in the port town of Holyhead.

He subsequently served as Incumbent of Pwllheli, a market town in rural North-West Wales; and then became an Incumbent in Cardiff. He returned to Bangor as Archdeacon in 2005. In 2011 he moved to become Commissary to the Bishop in Europe – a role which he combined with being Archdeacon of North-West Europe (serving Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands) before his current appointment as Archdeacon of France in 2016.

He currently has oversight of 83 congregations across France, many of which serve scattered, rural populations.

Meurig has been involved in fostering strong ecumenical relationships throughout his ministry, and is currently involved in discussions between the Church of England and the French Protestant churches. He also has good working relationships with the Roman Catholic Church in France and as a  fluent French-speaking Anglican has contributed to various ecumenical conferences, including at the Catholic Institute in Paris.

Meurig writes:

I am very excited about moving to become Rector of the Mallow Union, particularly in returning to being a pastor and an encourager in the local Church. I am especially energised by a move to Mallow as the town experiences growth and development, with an increasingly diverse population, as well as enabling the three churches to flourish in their distinctive ways. I enjoy art, cooking, cycling, gardening, music and walking – and am especially looking forward to discovering more of County Cork and Munster, as well as living and ministering in the Western-most part of the European Union. Above all, I am keen to get to know the people of the Union of parishes and the wider communities in which they are set as, together, we discern the future direction of the Church of Ireland community at the Crossroads of Munster.

Mallow Union of Parishes is located in the north-west corner of County Cork covering the area from the Kerry Border in the west to the Awbeg River in the east; and from the Limerick border to the north to the Nagle and Boggeragh Mountains in the south. It occupies mainly the beautiful Blackwater Valley and extends into the mountains on each side. It stands on the crossroads between the Limerick to Cork and Killarney to Cahir roads –  the ‘crossroads of Munster’ – and is the first main station on the Cork to Dublin railway line: two and a quarter hours from Dublin by rail and twenty-five minutes from Cork by road or rail. 

 

Posted in Announcements, Appointments, Archdeacon, Bishop

Cork Parish goes on Pilgrimage in the Footsteps of St. Patrick

At the end of August, Michael Kenning, a Diocesan Lay Reader in Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, based at Carrigrohane Union of Parishes, led a small group of young men from Carrigrohane and Christ Church, Bray, Co. Wicklow, on a pilgrimage in the footsteps of St. Patrick. Michael had been planning to walk the Camino Inglés in Northern Spain, but due to Covid-19, was inspired to walk an Irish alternative route instead!

Nzube Mekah resting in the Mournes.

The group walked the Saint Patrick’s Way in Northern Ireland from Navan Fort (Emain Macha), the ancient capital of Ulster, just outside Armagh City, to Downpatrick, the traditional burial place of Patrick. The 132 km (82 mile) pilgrim trail was developed a few years ago by Alan Graham, a veteran of Alpine and Arctic expeditions. It is designed to take in locations associated with the life and ministry of St. Patrick and to emulate the Camino de Santiago in an Irish setting through the provision of a Passport that pilgrims can get stamped at key locations along the route and keep as a souvenir after wards.

The pilgrimage took seven days to complete and each day the group used a liturgy and bible reading plan together as they walked, to help guide their prayers and provide the walk with a spiritual focus. They also stopped off where possible, to pray in churches, such as Newry Cathedral.

Journey’s end – Alexander Cupples, Tiarnán Healy, Jonathan Stanley & Nzube Mekah at St. Patrick’s grave in Downpatrick

The route takes in a surprising diversity of scenery and history along the way. It begins with the ancient Irish literary associations of The Táin and the Ulster Cycle connected with Emain Macha and the rich spiritual history of Armagh, continues with the industrial heritage of Ulster where the walk follows the 250-year-old Newry Canal,  rises to its highest elevation amongst the rugged beauty of the Mourne Mountains, traverses the estuarine and coastal habitats at Murlough Nature Reserve and Tyrella beach before concluding beside the Cathedral at Downpatrick, where Patrick was buried in A.D. 461. Along the way the group also examined the restored 16th century Bagenal’s Castle at Newry, the Anglo-Norman ruins of Dundrum Castle, the 7,000-year-old stone circle at Ballynoe and even an 18th century neo-gothic hermitage at Tollymore!

Michael commented:

Although I am originally from Co.Down, I learnt many new things about St. Patrick and the heritage of my home area. For me, it was much an interior pilgrimage into my past as it was a physical walk. It was a special privilege to travel with such an impressive group of young men, who taught me so much though their maturity, spiritual insights and perseverance. They were such a joy to spend time with.

Jonathan Stanley from Bray said

I started the St Patrick’s way with a list of decisions I had to make in my life. I hoped that this would be a good opportunity to sort them out with the Lord. Instead, I felt God encouraging me to simply enjoy his company and marvel at his creation as I walked. The Mournes were stunning and beautifully silent but I particularly enjoyed walking along the sea at Murlough Nature Reserve at dusk, listening to the sound of Oystercatchers and the sea. By the end of the walk I still hadn’t made a single decision, but I was pleased that I had “wasted” several days resting and enjoying a companionable silence with God.

The Bishop of Down & Dromore, the Right David McClay, Michael Kenning, Alexander Cupples, Nzube Mekah, Jonathan Stanley & Tiarnán Healy at Saul

The pilgrimage concluded at Saul Parish Church, which is the traditional site of the first church in Ireland that Patrick started in the barn of a local chieftain called Dichu. It was a special privilege to meet both the Rector of Saul, the Very Rev. Henry Hull and the Bishop of Down and Dromore, the Right Reverend David McClay, who despite a busy schedule took the time to meet the pilgrims, listen to their personal stories and pray with them. It was a fitting end to a wonderful and personally challenging  pilgrimage.

Jonathan Stanley and Nzube Mekah stamping their Pilgrim Passports in Armagh.

Posted in Diocese, Five Marks of Mission, People from Cork, People from the Diocese, Pilgrimage, Spirituality