Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross to be represented at Service of Thanksgiving for Bishop Samuel Poyntz

It has been announced that a Service of Thanksgiving for the life and ministry of a former Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, the Right Reverend Dr Samuel Poyntz, is to be held in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday next, 25th February 2017.  Dr Poyntz was Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross from 1978 to 1987.

The Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, the Right Reverend Dr Paul Colton, will be represented at the Service by his predecessor (Bishop Poyntz’s successor), the Right Reverend Roy Warke, who was Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross from 1988 to 1999. Bishop Warke also served on the House of Bishops with Bishop Poyntz who was translated to the Diocese of Connor to serve as Bishop there in 1987.

The clergy of Cork, Cloyne and Ross will be formally represented on Saturday by the Archdeacon of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, the Venerable Adrian Wilkinson. Formally representing the laity of the Diocese will be two people who worked closely with Bishop Poyntz during his time in Cork, Cloyne and Ross: Mr Wilfred Baker and Mr David Bird.

Wilfred Baker was Diocesan Secretary and worked with Bishop Poyntz in support of so many facets of the work of the Diocese, its parishes, schools and many charities.  Mr David Bird, who is one of the Diocesan Trustees, was on Diocesan Council and Diocesan Synod during the episcopate of Bishop Poyntz, and served also on General Synod, Standing Committee, and most notably, on the Role of the Church Committee which was such an important aspect of the late Bishop’s work.  Bishop Poyntz and Mr Bird were also two participants in the New Ireland Forum which met from 1983 to 1984.

On Sunday, 26th February Bishop Poyntz will be remembered at Church Services throughout Cork, Cloyne and Ross.  A minute’s silence will be kept and prayers of remembrance and thanksgiving offered.

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Posted in Bishop, Bishops of Cork, Church of Ireland, Church Services, Diocese

Death of a former Bishop of Cork, Bishop Samuel Poyntz ~ Statement by Bishop Paul Colton

Church of Ireland – Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross

Statement by The Right Rev Dr Paul Colton,

Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross

in response to the death of

a former Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross,

The Right Reverend Dr Samuel G. Poyntz

The Right Reverend Dr Paul Colton, Church of Ireland Bishop of Cork has made the following statement in response to the news of the death of a former Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, the Right Reverend Dr Samuel Poyntz. Bishop Poyntz, who died on Saturday last (18th February) was Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross for nine years, from September 1978 to 1987, when he was translated to the Diocese of Connor.

Bishop Colton’s statement:

‘Although it is 30 years since Bishop Sam Poyntz left Cork, Cloyne and Ross to become Bishop of Connor, within the small community that is the Church of Ireland, contact with him and his wife Noreen has been regular and deep friendship has endured between them and many in this Diocese.  In recent years, they both returned to visit the Diocese for a number of significant occasions including the 250th anniversary of Kingston College, the official opening of the new Ashton School, and the retirement of our long serving Diocesan Secretary, Wilfred Baker.

Mrs Noreen Poyntz and Bishop Samuel Poyntz on a visit to Cork, Cloyne and Ross in March 2015 . Photograph: Neil Danton.

Mrs Noreen Poyntz and Bishop Samuel Poyntz on a visit to Cork, Cloyne and Ross in March 2015 . Photograph: Neil Danton.

More than that, even though his episcopate in this Diocese was reasonably short – just under 9 years – Bishop Poyntz’s influence has endured, and his legacy is still felt and appreciated by many.  Even today, many of the characteristic phrases he used are referred to and repeated affectionately.

My wife and I were teenagers when he became our bishop and our story of knowing him is not untypical.  Sam Poyntz influenced those formative years greatly, and encouraged us, not only in the life of the Church of Ireland, but also in supporting our education and chosen careers.  Like other clergy from the Diocese (including my own contemporaries, Canon Robert Howard and Canon Nigel Baylor) he sponsored me for ordination training.  He made great efforts to nurture vocations in the Diocese, and to keep in touch over the years with those who responded.

Many have deeply personal memories and we are no exception.  When Susan and I married in Cork in 1986 he presided at the celebration of the Eucharist, and he and Noreen invited us to the gardens of the Bishop’s Palace to have the photographs taken.  By the time he arrived in Connor Diocese I was working at Belfast Cathedral and also as a domestic chaplain to his predecessor.  He continued that appointment and involved me in the arrangement of, and support for, a number of reconciliation and peace-making initiatives in those difficult days in Northern Ireland.

Bishop Poyntz was an innovator with a strong view of the role of the Church of Ireland.  He had clear ideas of how the Church should keep pace with change, especially with international developments, social issues, and he was clear that it should take its place both in ecumenical dialogue and the concerns of the wider Anglican Communion. From a strongly Church of Ireland perspective, he himself engaged with all of those matters locally, nationally and internationally. He created opportunities in Cork for encounter with those issues, including hosting a meeting of the British Council of Churches (as it then was) and a visit to the Diocese by the Archbishop of York of the day, the Most Reverend Stuart Blanch.  Bishop Poyntz was energetic and pragmatic. He was decisive and forthright in his views.  He was a strong supporter of Church music, and particularly of the development of the Cathedral Choir at St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.

Many did not realise how down to earth he was.  I recall well when I was a student at the Church of Ireland Theological College how he arrived to visit us announced.  On one such occasion,  I saw his car pulling up and went down to meet him: wrong thing to do!  ‘Should you not be in your study writing an essay?’ he said.  But then he came to the room, sat on the bed among us; ‘Put on the kettle.  Have you any biscuits?  Now!  How are things going?’  he asked.  When he departed he also left a cheque behind for practical support.  On other occasions there were gifts of books and core academic texts, or a cheque to buy a decent suit for ordination.

In Cork, Cloyne and Ross, in the late 1970s and 1980s he arrived with a flurry of enthusiasm after the long, steady, and pastoral episcopate of Bishop Gordon Perdue, a tenure which was no less innovative in its own ways.  Notably, Bishop Poyntz presided over the complete refurbishment of the Diocesan Office buildings at Cove Street, the relocation and construction of the first phases of Lapp’s Court (a sheltered housing complex), the consecration of the Chapel of Christ the Healer at the Regional Hospital (now Cork University Hospital), and major remedial works at Kingston College (another housing charity within the Diocese).  Two, among many, ecumenical initiatives are worthy of note.  First, as President of ICICYMA (the Incorporated Church of Ireland Cork Young Men’s Association) at Garryduff Sports Centre, he led the club to open its membership to people of all religious outlooks enabling it to become the club that it is today.  Second, before he left for Connor he was involved in the dialogue which led to the amalgamation of two religious-run voluntary hospitals, the Victoria Hospital and the South Infirmary, now the South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, Cork.  In its time this was a pioneering ecumenical step.

He was ahead of his time in many ways.  I remember well how, in his retiring remarks at his last meeting of the Standing Committee of the General Synod he said that one of his big regrets was that he had not managed to persuade the Church of Ireland of the value of and importance of periodic sabbatical leave for clergy for study and refreshment in ministry.

We remember our former Bishop, Samuel, with immense affection and thanksgiving to God and, on behalf of us all in Cork, Cloyne and Ross, I extend our sincere sympathy to all his family, especially to his wife Noreen, and his children Jennifer, Tim and Stephanie and their families.  May he rest in God’s peace and rise in glory.’

Bishop Paul Colton chatting with Bishop Samuel Poyntz.

Bishop Paul Colton chatting with Bishop Samuel Poyntz.

– Ends –

Further information from:

Sam Wynn Church of Ireland Diocesan Communications Officer

Telephone:   +353 (0)86 813 7659

E mail media@corkchurchofireland.com

Posted in Bishop, Bishops of Cork, Church of Ireland, Cloyne and Ross, Diocese, Statement by the Bishop

Come and Sing – Vivaldi ‘Gloria’ at St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork

St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork, and its Director of Music, Peter Stobart, teamed up with the the Cork International Choral Festival on Saturday, 11th February for a very special day-long Come and Sing event; rehearsing and performing one of our history’s most magnificent choral works – Vivaldi’s Gloria.

St Fin Barre's Cathedral, Director of Music, rehearses with some of those who took part in 'Come and Sing'

St Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Director of Music, rehearses with some of those who took part in ‘Come and Sing’

2017 was the first time for such a collaboration and get-together. Sixty-three singers from all backgrounds came along for the rehearsal and to learn the piece which was then performed that same evening, under the direction of Peter Stobart, and with Trevor Selby from Limerick on the organ.

Peter Stobart (Director of Music, St Fin Barre's Cathedral) with John Fitzpatrick (Cork International Choral Festival)

Peter Stobart (Director of Music, St Fin Barre’s Cathedral) with John Fitzpatrick (Cork International Choral Festival)

Trevor Selby, organist

Trevor Selby, organist

 

Posted in Church Music

Clonakilty Hosts Annual Youth Workers Weekend in Cork, Cloyne and Ross

The annual Cork Diocesan Youth Council (CDYC) leaders’ weekend took place in the Quality Hotel, Clonakilty from Friday 27th to Sunday 29th January.

Steve Grasham, newly appointed to the role of Regional Development worker for the Church of Ireland Youth Department, covering the south of Ireland, led sessions on the importance of youth groups, how to develop a youth programme, different models of youth ministry and how to engage young people in the programme. Simon Henry, National Youth Officer was also present and spoke about what the Church of Ireland Youth Department (CIYD) is doing in developing youth ministry across the Church. It was a great time of sharing and learning.

On Saturday evening clergy from the area were invited to join the group for dinner. On Sunday morning the group attended morning worship in Kilgarriffe Church.

Youth workers who took part in the the recent Cork, Cloyne and Ross weekend for them in Clonakilty.

Youth workers who took part in the the recent Cork, Cloyne and Ross weekend for them in Clonakilty.

Posted in CDYC, Diocese, Lay Ministry, Voluntary Work, Youth Work

Cork Preacher at Irish Language Service for Week of Prayer for Christian Unity

Bhí an tUrr Antóin Ó Mhurchú ón Deoise Corcaigh, ag seanmóireacht ag an tSeirbhís Idirchreidmheach in Ardteampall Chríost le linn Sheachtain na hAontachta Críostaí.   Eagraíonn Cumann Gaelach na hEaglaise agus Pobal an Aifrinn ag tseirbhís.

Thosaigh an tseirbhís seo daichead bliain ó shin agus bíonn ministir éagsuil i mbun seanmóireachta gach bliain.

The Rev. Tony Murphy, from the Church of Ireland Diocese of Cork, preached at the Irish language Interdenominational Service in Christchurch Cathedral Dublin during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. This service is organised by Cumann Gaelach na hEaglaise  (the Irish Guild of the Church) and Pobal an Aifrinn.

This annual service, which began over 40 years ago, has never had to call on the same minister twice to preach in Irish.

 From Left:  Monseigneur  Dan Ó Connor, the Rev. Tony Murphy and the Rev. David Oxley

From Left: Monseigneur Dan Ó Connor, the Rev. Tony Murphy and the Rev. David Oxley

Posted in Church of Ireland, Church Services, Diocese, Ecumenism, Irish Language

Ecumenical Service in Carrigaline, Co Cork marks Week of Prayer for Christian Unity 2017

This year the material for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity (18-25 January each year) was prepared by the churches in Germany and focused on the 500th anniversary of the German Reformation. The theme was reconciliation:  ‘Reconciliation: the love of Christ compels us’ (based on 2 Corinthians 5:14-20).

At the Ecumenical Service (l-r) were: the Rev. Tony Murphy, Richard Dring, the Rev. Elaine Murray, Fr Pat Fogarty, and Fr Con Cronin.

At the Ecumenical Service (l-r) were: the Rev. Tony Murphy, Richard Dring, the Rev. Elaine Murray, Fr Pat Fogarty, and Fr Con Cronin.

On Wednesday 25th, an Ecumenical Service was held in St Mary’s Church, Carrigaline, Co. Cork using these materials.  They were adapted for local use by Churches Together in Britain and Ireland (CTBI) called  ‘Crossing Barriers’.

SPeaker at the Ecumenbical Service, Dr Andrew Pierce (right) with parishioners of Our Lady and St John's, Carrigaline.

Speaker at the Ecumenical Service, Dr Andrew Pierce (right) with parishioners of Our Lady and St John’s, Carrigaline.

The Church of Ireland Parish of Carrigaline Union has two churches , St Mary’s in Carrigaline and St John’s in Monkstown and in that context, the Service was a joint initiative of the clergy of Carrigaline Union, the Roman Catholic Parishes of Our Lady  and St John (Carrigaline), and the Harbour Parishes (Monkstown, Ringaskiddy, Shanbally and Passage West). We were delighted to welcome Dr Andrew Pierce, from the Irish School of Ecumenics, Trinity College Dublin, as the guest speaker. A time of hospitality and refreshments followed afterwards in Carrigaline Parish Hall.

Posted in Church Services, Ecumenism, Week of Prayer for Christian Unity

‘Resident – Staff – Family Relationships’ ~ An Important Conference for Healthcare Professionals To Be Hosted by St Luke’s Charity, Cork

Every year in Ireland thousands of older adults are admitted to residential care.

Saint Luke’s Charity, Cork which has been involved in this type of care since 1872 is hosting an important conference for healthcare professionals, particularly those involved in residential care, on Thursday, 6th April at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Little Island, Cork.  The conference is being organised by the charity’s education and research centre – Northridge House.

The conference, entitled ‘Resident – Staff – Family Relationships’ will explore the emotive, challenging and complex relationships that arise when older adults are admitted to residential care.   The conference will also focus on how best to achieve positive outcomes for families, staff and particular residents themselves.

Dr Michael Bauer

Dr Michael Bauer

The conference focus is on the nursing home and disability sectors with an impressive line-up of speakers representing both of these.  The keynote speaker, Dr. Michael Bauer from Australia has conducted extensive research and published in this area. All at St Luke’s are honoured and delighted that he has agreed to deliver the keynote address.  This 5th Annual Conference aims to acknowledge and address the family’s emotive journey, and will encourage the conference participants to nurture positive staff-family relationships by providing an insight into how this might occur, discussing and demonstrating strategies which work and pitfalls to avoid at different points in the resident’s journey.

Research has shown that building strong trusting relationships in an unfamiliar environment with family members who find themselves in a strange place with new roles to play and complex rules to interpret, is not easy. Family emotions are often prominent in staff-family relationships; and at times such relationships may become divisive rather than one of partnership in the approach to the care and welfare of the resident. Such an environment can produce tension and difficulties for residents, families and staff. This is evidenced by a large number of complaints raised by relatives and seen in the media, in both the nursing home and disability sectors of residential care.

The full conference brochure is available here:  conference-brochure

Bookings & Enquiries to:

Claire Coakley (claire.coakley@stlukeshome.ie )

Bruce Pierce (bruce.pierce@stlukeshome.ie )

Phone number:  021 453 6551

www.northridgehouse.ie

 

Posted in Care of the Elderly, Charities in the Diocese, Charity Work, Cork, Education, Northridge House, Saint Luke's Charity, Saint Luke's Home Education Centre